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Tony and Ann Bull

Our property had about 30 ha of established bush and some open fields, as well as a house and barns. The year after we bought the place we had 6 ha planted in red pine thanks to the Woodlands Improvement Agreement. The bush is quite varied; stands of white pine and poplar and many mixed stands. A small area of red pine was planted in the mid 1970’s. There had been no extensive harvest in 50 years.

Over the years we cut enough wood to heat the house and sell a small amount that we did not need. We cut trees of inferior quality and those that competed too successfully with red pine which need full light.

Membership in OWA led to learning more about woodlot management. In addition, we achieved Forest Stewardship Certification for the woodlot via the Eastern Ontario Model Forest that holds the FSC certificate.

In preparing a management plan we became convinced that the established forest was in need of an improvement thinning. The thinning operation started in the winter of 2005; the last load taken out in October 2006. A local horse logger conducted the operation under contract with Laverne Heideman and Sons. They did not have the best quote price-wise, but they had a good reputation for a quality operation. Our interest was in the state of the bush after logging, number one; and a fair price. We felt that we achieved both. And in 2011 we had a first thinning of the red pine plantations that we had planted in 1986.

In addition to working in the bush we hike and ski on our trails, and enjoy the solitude and privacy that comes with a substantial area of land. Caring for the bush and its inhabitants and outdoor experiences in all seasons and weather, both severe and benign, has greatly enriched our lives.

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  • Thom Snowman, Limestone Chapter
    Thom Snowman, Limestone Chapter

    Thom Snowman has spent most of his life in New England—outdoors. During a decade in outdoor education, he got to know Canada through bicycle and canoe trips and grew fond of the north woods. After the career that followed, as a forester working in Boston’s water supply forests, Thom was fortunate to be able to retire in Canada, where he and wife Carol have settled in the Napanee area.

    As Thom began searching out ways to exercise his interest in forests and forestry, he found and joined the OWA. He says, “While there are many common species and similar natural resource issues (invasive species, impacts of climate change, etc.) in Ontario woodlands and New England forests, they are also distinctly different both in the details of their physical make-up and in the human community charged with their care and management. OWA is a model organization for addressing the concerns of anyone who has realized the critical link between our forests and our future. Personally, I am fortunate to have found an excuse to wander private woodlands and get to know their owners here in southern Ontario!”

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